Veg firm pays workers whopping £62k-a-year to pick cabbage and broccoli amid EU migrant staff shortage


A VEG firm is looking for workers to pick cabbages – for the equivalent of over £62,000-A-YEAR

T H Clements and Son Ltd’s field operatives jobs are not seasonal and are for work all year round.

Picking vegetables is seen as a difficult or unattractive job among many BritsCredit: Getty – Contributor
Empty fruit and vegetables shelves are becoming a common sight across the UK

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Empty fruit and vegetables shelves are becoming a common sight across the UK

They are being advertised at £30-per-hour – which works out at £240-per-day or £1,200-per-week.

The monthly pay for a full time gig is £4,800 and an annual salary of £62,400-a-year.

It comes amid a shortage of fruit and veg pickers due to the Covid crisis and Brexit woes.

Both have halted migrant workers from being able to travel to the UK to work.

Not enough Brits have not applied for the roles across the country forcing the pay up because demand is so high.

T H Clements and Son Ltd, based in Boston, Lincs posted one job advert that read: “We are looking for Field Operatives to harvest our Cabbages.

“Excellent piecework rates with potential to earn up to £30 per hour and all year round work available.”

Another similar one added: “We are looking for Field Operatives to harvest our Broccoli.

Excellent piecework rates with potential to earn up to £30 per hour and all year round work available.”

Robert Newbery, regional director of the National Farmers’ Union, said: “Brexit is certainly having an impact.

“The people that could move freely within Europe before now can’t.”

It comes amid growing fears that Brits could run out of their favourite groceries and dinner choices.

But shoppers were told “don’t panic” yesterday as supermarket giants fought to maintain supplies.

Iceland boss Richard Walker reassured Brits that stores will not run out of goods, telling the Express: “There is no need to panic buy.”

His message was echoed by Downing Street, who urged Brits not to stockpile after food production delays and fuel rationing fears rocked consumers.





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